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 Religion in SciFi, spinoff from Kerra's B5 philosophy topic
nova
Posted: Dec 20 2007, 12:51 PM
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QUOTE (Kerra @ Dec 19 2007, 11:26 PM)
QUOTE (Dennis10458 @ Dec 19 2007, 08:22 PM)
When a mortally wounded Jaffa warrior utters the "I die free" line, is this a religious utterance?

My son, who is an expert on Jaffa Warriors believes rather than a religious utterance, its really a statement of independence.

That makes sense to me - because they're trying to get away from the religion of believing that the Goa'uld are gods, so wouldn't that make "I die free" a sort of anti-religious statement in context? smile.gif
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horselover fat
Posted: Dec 20 2007, 04:46 PM
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As noted in the Christmas message thread...I won't be around until after Christmas!...but I did want to reply on one note....

Religion and Babylon 5....

As I stated in my previous post about predestination, I believe forces make us who we are to become. Nothing is more relevant than G'Kar's spiritual journey. How he turns from who he is at the beginning of the series to who he becomes at the end of the series is not only well-thought out by JMS, but reflects all of our spirituals lives...

"Our lives are journeys, and the bumps in the road shape us, the bends in the road strengthen us, and the people we meet on the road change our perceptions of life"--GK Chesterton

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MadAmosMalone
Posted: Dec 22 2007, 07:52 AM
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Let's not forget a couple of other lessons B5 teaches us. I wanna preface this by saying I am still an atheist but have experienced enough "weirdness" in my life to know there's more than just what reason and science can ever explain.

First, I believe it was Delenn who said the universe ("god" if you prefer) sometimes puts us into difficult places so that we may learn something. This is an idea I've had to take to heart lately.

Also, another idea I've been forced to confront, this one from Brother Alwin. "Faith and reason are like the shoes on your feet. You'll get farther with both than you ever could with either." This reminds me much of the line from Matthew McConaughey's character from Contact. When Jodie Foster has her transcendent experience and no one believes her except him, he's asked why he, a religious guy, would have "faith" in her story. He responds by saying something to the effect of having a different covenant but the same goal, that being the search for truth.

I say all that to say this. Given that I've experienced enough strange things that defy explanation I begin to wonder if there are some things that should remain inexplicable. Metaphysics means literally "beyond physics." I'm starting to wonder if seeking a scientific explanation for some things that are clearly beyond today's science is as "wrong" (for want of a better word) as seeking a religious answer for explainable phenomena.

Lemme close with my own counter-point though. Science has a built-in self-correcting mechanism, that being the lack of "authority." Even as revered as people like Isaac Newton or Einstein are, they can be taken to task with enough data and experimentation provided the methodology is sound. Faith is a different matter entirely. If we were to blindly accept there are some things that are inexplicable we might not have the level of scientific understanding of the universe as we do today.

Though I recognize the validity of the counter argument I still have to say I actually kinda like at least a little mystery in my life. To paraphrase G'Kar, I am comforted by the fact we haven't yet explained everything.


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Kerra
Posted: Dec 22 2007, 12:25 PM
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Wow Amos, your thoughts have provoled deep reflection for me on this Saturday morning. Thanks, I needed a good kick in the brain. biggrin.gif

In this season, this year, when aloneness seems to be my most frequent companion, I must agree that G’Kar’s statement, “I am comforted by the fact we haven't yet explained everything.” brings me a little peace.

Delenn’s statement, “… the universe ("god" if you prefer) sometimes puts us into difficult places so that we may learn something.” I am with you on this Amos, it is a lesson I again believe is running its course before me, but I wonder, since it is obvious I cannot figure this out logically (because I have tried) and since I have nothing other than faith to fall back upon, is this not the truth Delenn is trying to show us. It is faith that we need in order to choose the right path or the right thing to do.

I am not about to throw my skepticism out the window nor ignore my beloved science, but as a person brought up in the Roman Catholic Church I find that it is when I ignore my roots, my faith, if you will, that I find myself either in trouble, or sadly alone. This refers back to the other statement you quoted Amos, from Brother Alwin:

"Faith and reason are like the shoes on your feet. You'll get
farther with both than you ever could with either."

If I had been walking without one shoe, say without my faith strongly in place, literally then, one foot would show all the bruises, cuts and chaffing of my journey, whereas the other would be relatively left unscarred (but think about this, the foot with the protection of the shoe is now unbalanced and if one walks too far without the other shoe, even the protected foot reveals blisters and wear). So then we suffer a paradox of balance.

This paradox of balance can be seen most clearly in G’Kar’s spiritual journey through the five year arc. Whereas G’Kar practices his spiritual rituals during the first season of the show, it is only after his arrogance has brought him down to the bottom of life, his home world invaded again, his ambassadorial appointment stripped, and murderous thoughts get him thrown in jail. But once G’Kar re-establishes balance in his life his life takes on new meaning. It does not get easier, oh no, he must face the dungeons of the Centari, but he faces all that with dignity and integrity, because of his renewed faith and the balance between logical and faith.There is so much to admire in the character of G’Kar.

So I guess I am saying, a healthy balance between both, is perhaps the best path to tread upon, if we look at G’Kar’s story.


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Dennis10458
Posted: Dec 26 2007, 01:17 PM
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In the first ST:TOS movie, Spock is shown meditating in the Vulcan desert when he hears the mind of V'ger . . .

Is he having a "religious" experience?
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Kerra
  Posted: Dec 26 2007, 02:19 PM
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QUOTE (Dennis10458 @ Dec 26 2007, 12:17 PM)
In the first ST:TOS movie, Spock is shown meditating in the Vulcan desert when he hears the mind of V'ger . . .

Is he having a "religious" experience?

My answer to your question Dennis is, heck no.

Just because Spock is out in the desert, praying and perhaps looking for a religious experience doesn't mean he gets one because a super-conciousness contacts him.

In the many religions I have studied superconsciousness does not equate "god" therefore one has to be very skeptical about who and what it is contacting you when praying and mediatating.

Too many times those in deep prayer or meditation confuse their own thoughts with that for which they are hoping to contact, that being "God."

Spock at least has the wherewithall to know V"ger is not God, whereas his brother in the later film, "The Final Frontier" (where btw one of my all time favorite Kirk quotes comes ... I need my pain!) cannot decifer the trick of an evil superconsciousness.

I always feel pity for Sybok because his belief is so certain and then when enlightenment comes he crushed to his soul ... the soul of a Vulcan crushed always saddens me.


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horselover fat
Posted: Dec 26 2007, 04:33 PM
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Hey guys!

I hope that you all had a happy holiday!

Faith/reason- The quote from Brother Alwyn reminds me of a quote from CS Lewis. This is not verbatim...but in essence the quote goes..."I do not rest my thoughts upon faith, for it is my belief that God created me, therefore God would want me to use my logic also and not waste all the resources he gave me..."

The Episcopal church is the only major Christian demoniation I know of that makes a point of preaching that we must use our mind and inteleect and not blindly be led. Every Episcopal church preaches this that I have ever attended/worked at.

The other point I'd like to make is that I believe the ultimate reason G'Kar and Londo's fates are so inseperable is that they both must make amends towards the other. JMS's points specifically toward the forgiveness process, and as G'Kar learns to forgive, and Londo learns to take reposibility for his own actions, that the spiritual journey of both characters come to bear specifically on forgiveness and acceptance!

Any thoughts?

HF


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Dennis10458
Posted: Dec 28 2007, 10:22 PM
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In B5's episode "There All Honor Lies", does Sheridan have a "religious" experience when he is "serenaded" by the group in the secluded area?


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Kerra
Posted: Dec 28 2007, 10:38 PM
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QUOTE (Dennis10458 @ Dec 28 2007, 09:22 PM)
In B5's episode "A Perfect Moment", does Sheridan have a "religious" experience when he is "serenaded" by the group in the secluded area?

Dennis... interested in the religious journey it seems...

Sheridan makes no real remark about his spiritual feelings, and I believe it is Kosh that wants Sheridan to witness a moment of beauty. Sometimes one can have a religious experience in the presence of beauty. I believe it is the purpose of Kosh to reveal to Sheridan all that he is fighting for and what would be lost if he gives up the fight.




Hey HF: The other point I'd like to make is that I believe the ultimate reason G'Kar and Londo's fates are so inseperable is that they both must make amends towards the other. JMS's points specifically toward the forgiveness process, and as G'Kar learns to forgive, and Londo learns to take reposibility for his own actions, that the spiritual journey of both characters come to bear specifically on forgiveness and acceptance!

Although I believe this question should more readily be answered in the B5 character section, I will say that I do not believe Londo makes a spiritual jouney. He is enlightened in Season 5, but I am not sure his journey is religious or spiritual, and because I think that I believe this question is best suited for the other section.


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nova
Posted: Dec 29 2007, 10:20 PM
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QUOTE (Kerra @ Dec 26 2007, 02:19 PM)
QUOTE (Dennis10458 @ Dec 26 2007, 12:17 PM)
In the first ST:TOS movie, Spock is shown meditating in the Vulcan desert when he hears the mind of V'ger . . .

Is he having a "religious" experience?

My answer to your question Dennis is, heck no.

Just because Spock is out in the desert, praying and perhaps looking for a religious experience doesn't mean he gets one because a super-conciousness contacts him.

In the many religions I have studied superconsciousness does not equate "god" therefore one has to be very skeptical about who and what it is contacting you when praying and mediatating.

Too many times those in deep prayer or meditation confuse their own thoughts with that for which they are hoping to contact, that being "God."

Spock at least has the wherewithall to know V"ger is not God, whereas his brother in the later film, "The Final Frontier" (where btw one of my all time favorite Kirk quotes comes ... I need my pain!) cannot decifer the trick of an evil superconsciousness.

I always feel pity for Sybok because his belief is so certain and then when enlightenment comes he crushed to his soul ... the soul of a Vulcan crushed always saddens me.

There are a lot of "religious" people who should watch at least that much of Star Trek! As far as I'm concerned, someone who says, even with all sincerity, "I prayed/meditated/whatever, and God told me to do this" is self-deluded. Or badly in need of a) a psychologist, cool.gif an exorcist or hopefully just c) a good theologian.

In answer to Dennis's question, I would also say this: does Spock himself take hearing V'ger as a religious experience? Because I think that to a great extent what qualifies as religious experience depends on who's defining it, and what they're defining it as. Mostly when I see or hear the phrase "religious experience" I tend to think of it as meaning some emotionally significant experience which leads the one having it to a greater understanding of God, themselves, the universe, or any combination thereof, which may or may not be tied in with any particular religion, and the understanding gained may or may not be accurate. Which would mean that Sybok in Final Frontier actually does have "religious experiences" because that's what he perceives, even though he's being tricked.
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Dennis10458
Posted: Dec 30 2007, 10:21 AM
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QUOTE (nova @ Dec 29 2007, 10:20 PM)
Because I think that to a great extent what qualifies as religious experience depends on who's defining it, and what they're defining it as. Mostly when I see or hear the phrase "religious experience" I tend to think of it as meaning some emotionally significant experience which leads the one having it to a greater understanding of God, themselves, the universe, or any combination thereof, which may or may not be tied in with any particular religion, and the understanding gained may or may not be accurate.

Nova,

Thanks especially for this post - it gives me a good segway to more than one point I hope to bring out in this thread . . .

Regarding the underscored portion your post . . .

I heard a talk in the early 1980's given by a minister who was "auditioning" for that position at the church I attended. He subscribed to the "religion as response" concept.

He proposed two tiers of "religious" response levels
  1. celebration
  2. worship

Celebration is a moderate level of response typically associated with routine church services (and may extend into daily activities outside church)

Worship is an extreme level of response more often associated with actual life experiences, but which sometimes occur during normal church services.

As an example of "worship", he told a story about his boyhood, when, at the age of 9, he was tracking a rabbit to bring to the family table.

It had snowed and it was easy to follow the rabbit. The tracks led into a clearing. Then, in the middle of the clearing, the trail of rabbit tracks abruptly ended. Where the trail ended, there were tufts of rabbit hair, some flecks of blood, and a few feathers. He could see where the snow had been disturbed by the wingtips of a large bird of prey.

At that moment, he saw the web of life. And he fell in the snow. He worshipped.





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Dennis10458
Posted: Dec 30 2007, 10:44 AM
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QUOTE (nova @ Dec 29 2007, 10:20 PM)
Does Spock himself take hearing V'ger as a religious experience? Because I think that to a great extent what qualifies as religious experience depends on who's defining it, and what they're defining it as.

If Spock is defining the experience, would he use a definition with the word "emotional" in it? Maybe . . . in fact probably . . . when you consider something he said toward the end of the movie . . .

The effect of this experience is strong enough to compel Spock to pursue contact with that (gistquote) "most purely logical mind he ever felt".

At the end of the movie, V'ger transcends what it is - it acquires something greater than logic. (I would just throw out the idea that V'ger strikes me as being equal to the ancient alien computer depicted in "Forbidden Planet")

Kirk is led to an understanding of what V'ger needs by what Spock tells him in sick bay after returning from the mind-meld with V'ger . . .

He told Kirk (again, gistwise), "For all its power and vast scope, there is something missing in V'ger. V'ger doesn't know this (grasps Kirk's hand)"

There are two songs with germane lyrics . . .

One is Moody Blues "Tuesday Afternoon"

Tuesday, afternoon,
I'm just beginning to see,
Now I'm on my way,
It doesn't matter to me,
Chasing the clouds away.

Something, calls to me,
The trees are drawing me near,
I've got to find out why
Those gentle voices I hear
Explain it all with a sigh.

I would apply those lyrics to the scene where Spock first hears V'ger.

The other lyric is from the Rolling Stones

You Can't Always Get What You Want
But if you try . . .
Sometimes you get what you need.

Maybe Spock did get what he wanted (contact with that "purely logical mind").
He also got something else.

That something else was what he needed . . .

There's no way I could be satisfied applying the term "celebrate" to Spock's experience - I'd have to use "worship" . . .
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Kerra
  Posted: Dec 30 2007, 03:27 PM
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This post has been edited by me, Kerra, out of fear I have unnecessarily angered others. Truly though, my meaning was misunderstood. I apologize to all.

This post has been edited by Kerra on Dec 30 2007, 11:08 PM


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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 2 2008, 10:02 PM
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Religion in scifi - shucks! - howabout science as religion?!


http://agricola.typepad.com/agricola/2006/...ience_a_re.html

At one point in this article, I was reminded of the scene in the Serenity movie where the preacher tells the Captain "Believe something."
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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 12 2008, 12:32 PM
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Reading from "Broca's Brain: Reflections on the Romance of Science", page 282, by Carl Sagan

In the history of the world there have been, probably, tens of thousands of different religions. There is a well-intentioned pious belief that they are all fundamentally identical. In terms of an underlying psychological resonance, there may indeed be important similarities at the cores of many religions, but in the details of ritual and doctrine, and the apologias considered to be authenticating, the diversity of organized religions is striking. Human religions are mutually exclusive on such fundamental issues as:

1. one god versus many;

2. the origin of evil;

3. reincarnation;

4. idolatry;

5. magic and witchcraft;

6. the role of women;

7. dietary proscriptions;

8. rites of passage;

9. ritual sacrifice;

10. direct or mediated access to deities;

11. slavery;

12. intolerance of other religions; and

13. the community of beings to whom special ethical considerations are due.

We do no service to religion in general or to any doctrine in particular if we paper over these differences. Instead, I believe we should understand the world views from which differing religions derive and seek to understand what human needs are fulfilled by those differences.

********************************************************************

End of citation. Originally, paragraph was unbroken. I broke it to add a numbered list for the issues he mentioned in order to help bring them out and help refer to them in this thread.

Reposting to avoid confusion with other comments in first posting . . .
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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 12 2008, 12:37 PM
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To re-start this conversation, I want to repeat a couple of quotes from the first post and add some links to some other sites with good germane quotes:

Science IS my religion! (Christian Hyugens - believed to be the first person to have seen the rings of Saturn.)

I have to BUH-LEAVE in my science! (one of my favorite - if not THE favorite - line from X-Files, Scully)

http://www.rent-a-cloud.com/quotations.php

http://www.heartquotes.net/Einstein.html

A google search for a not-entirely-correctly recollected Einstein quote yielded the two links above. If you search for keywords on those pages like miracle, science, faith, religion etc., you find some interesting quotes . . . The two I want to cite here are:

Albert Einstein
There are two ways to live your life - one is as though nothing is a miracle, the other is as though everything is a miracle.


Walt Whitman
I know of nothing but miracles.

Also, from the first post:

What is "religion"?

(at the risk of sounding - or even BEING - pedantic) Religion is a 7-letter, 3-syllable word.

I repeat this thought to help establish the direction I would like this thread to take with a wide, ecclectic scope . . .

Religion has multiple meanings. Even in the paragraph I cited from Carl Sagan (reposted at http://z7.invisionfree.com/Vanguard_Statio...topic=171&st=39 to avoid confusion), each instance of the word "religion" (emphasize with underscores for convenience) strikes me as having a slightly different meaning. One meaning of religion is "groups of people who identify themselves with the same religious name and ostensibly hold the same icons dear, and the same beliefs dear".

Some of these sets of icons and beliefs which are called religions have persisted over centuries and have attained world-class status, in no particular order:

1. Taoism

2. Judaism

3. Christianity

4. Islam

5. Buddhism

6. Hindu


If Seals and Crofts' "Nine Houses" opening lyric (Nine houses that faith built) is any indication, I should look for at least 3 more . . .

Nevermind the Branches of each of these . . . e.g. Branches of Islam, Sunni, Shiite, Sufi

In 1973, I tried door-to-door sales of Bible reference sets to make money for college. On that trek, I walked past a building that was obviously a church, before I saw the sign. The name of the church was "Church of the Open Door". The minister let me in his house and ate and visited. He and his family were very nice. It was a one-congregation denomination the name of which was derived from a single Bible verse . . . The Bible has 1,250,000 words approximately, and 100,000 sentences, also approximately. I wonder how many sects are possible . . .

So, subsects not withstanding, if my reading of the cited Sagan paragraph is on target, individuals in each of these "religions" will have views on the various issues listed by Sagan, and the views on these issues will be somewhat consistent among individual members . . .

To the extent that each of these issues is relevant, and to the extent that scifi is relevant (the best of which being based on history and all that), scifi should, with some regularity, touch on these issues.

In the 10 days this article has been idle, I've looked up episodes from various scifi series (trek and sg1, mostly, with intent to go through Andomeda, Earth: Final Conflict, and B5 soon) that prominently, or at least tangentially, touch on these issues.

Example: The SG1 episode "Emancipation" touches on number 5, the role of women.

Over the next few weeks, I plan to post links to episode summaries and comment on them as they relate to these various "religious" issues listed by Sagan. If you see an episode that relates to one of these issues, feel free to jump in and post a link to the summary and add your comments . . .
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Kerra
  Posted: Jan 12 2008, 01:00 PM
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Perhaps this might help your list of religions.

In Huston Smith's book "The Religions of Man," Confucianism is listed as the fourth religion, and Confucius as the first teacher of the Chinese.


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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 13 2008, 09:40 PM
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I've checked the air schedules and a few of the episodes germane to this thread will be on-air soon. They are:

01/16/2008 STARGATE SG-1 SPIRITS
01/18/2008 Voyager Emanations
01/27/2008 Voyager The 37's
02/01/2008 STARGATE SG-1 THE OTHER GUYS

Mark your calendars and set your tivo's or vcr's
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Kerra
  Posted: Jan 15 2008, 03:37 PM
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Dangerous consequences will follow when politicians and rulers forget moral principles. Whether we believe in God or karma, ethics is the foundation of every religion.

-His Holiness the Dalai Lama


I like this because we can apply it across the spectrum into all scifi TV, Film, and Novel form.

02/01/2008 STARGATE SG-1 THE OTHER GUYS ... Dennis? I don't get it?

This post has been edited by Kerra on Jan 15 2008, 03:40 PM


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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 15 2008, 06:25 PM
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QUOTE (Kerra @ Jan 15 2008, 03:37 PM)
Dangerous consequences will follow when politicians and rulers forget moral principles. Whether we believe in God or karma, ethics is the foundation of every religion.

-His Holiness the Dalai Lama


I like this because we can apply it across the spectrum into all scifi TV, Film, and Novel form.

02/01/2008 STARGATE SG-1 THE OTHER GUYS ... Dennis? I don't get it?



Emphasis on ethics.

What is ethics?

Well, ethical behaviour is acceptable (to someone - group) behaviour.

Behaviour - action action - response . . .

Just to show a connection between the Dalai Lama's definition of religion and the "religion as response" concept I hope to weave into this thread.

As for the other guys, I'll post my thoughts the day after the episode airs. Watching the ep is better than reading the summary any day!

Meanwhile, go about 6 posts back to the 12-item list from the Sagan paragraph and think about the episode. I want to pace this discussion. One way to do that is to let air time determine what episodes are discussed. Since I have no control over air times, this helps place me on an equal footing with everyone else - or at least a more equal footing than I would be otherwise. I don't expect anyone else to observe this limit. If you see religious aspect of an ep in a series, jump in . . .
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Kerra
Posted: Jan 15 2008, 07:10 PM
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QUOTE (Dennis10458 @ Jan 15 2008, 05:25 PM)
Emphasis on ethics.

What is ethics?

Well, ethical behaviour is acceptable (to someone - group) behaviour.

Behaviour - action action - response . . .

Behavior as action? What of the lack of action, taking no action? Silent? Silence? Inaction? Unethical? Lack of ethics? The lack of action and/or ethics is also a behavior or not.

I do not see ethics as behavior, but more a code of ideas to adhere to... or not... for ethics is a part of philosophy in which ideas are set forth but not always acted upon. One may contemplate Hedonism without becoming a Hedonist.

But perhaps I miss your point.

Is His Holiness the Dali Lama wrong in his assessment that at the base of all religions there is an agreed upon ethical contract?

Or does his Holiness actually have a legitimate point in that to have a religion there must be an agreed upon ethical base from which to begin?

Each episode you have mentioned has, at its core, an agreed upon ethical cornerstone of which the story is based.

I await eagerly to read your assessments.


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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 16 2008, 06:28 PM
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"You Are Cordially Invited . . ."

After tossing and turning a couple of hours last night (change of weather here), I got up and turned on the tube. DS9 was on SpikeTV. It was the ep where Worf and Dax get married. Anybody else see that, or remember it?

I think I may have seen a "rite of passage" or two (number seven [7] on your menu).
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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 16 2008, 06:43 PM
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Ok, "Spirits" has been aired.

Depending on how you view the aliens, pertinent items on "the list" are

1. one god versus many;

2. the origin of evil; (What makes "spirits" good and Goa'uld evil?)

2.a reincarnation; (return of disappeared characters also Dennis10458 boobooed when he made reference list)

3. idolatry; (if viewer does not see "spirits" as god, what of Tonane's reverance for them?)

4. magic and witchcraft; (magic mostly, why did Sagan include "witchcraft" in same line?)

5. the role of women; (female spirit)

9. direct or mediated access to deities;

10. slavery; (spirit's liberation of Tonane's people from Goa'uld)

11. intolerance of other religions; and (willingness to destroy Tah-ree)

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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 18 2008, 08:59 AM
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I think I've seen "Spriits" about 4 times. It occurs to me that stories are not meant to be told once and only once. I had intended to watch the episode before commenting on it. And I did watch everything from where SG-11 comes out of the mist. However, unexpected company had shown up and I missed seeing the part before that.

I watched THAT yesterday.

The exchanges between Carter and Tonane while Zales and Takelee (the wolf) were present on the other planet said a lot - a lot about Carter's character - not all of it good - but not really bad.

Because of O'Neill's injury, this mission becomes Carter's first command, for which O'Neill congratulates her from his infimary bed.

The (objective) science, which serves Carter so well in most other situations, fails her here, and in fact, is a mild impediment. She TRIES to "play along", but her PREJUDICES (all limited world views are prejudiced - and all world views held by human individuals are limited) prevent her from fully engaging the wolf. She tries to be nice calling the wolf a beautiful animal - but that animal is all she can see. So Carter defers to T'ealc anc Jackson. They appear more sincere, IMHO, they ARE sincere.

T'ealc and Jackson can "hear" what Zales and the wolf "say". Carter cannot. In this aspect, Carter resembles Londo on B5 where he sees nothing when Kosh saves Sheridan.

*********************************************

Tonane says, "The spirits told me to shoot an arrow through the wall of standing water - so I did it." Apparently, his obedience of the spirits is unconditional.

Later, he tells Zales, "You have always been good to my people."

At one point, Tonane says, "My anscestors used to dance to summon Zales. But one day, Zales said, 'just call my name" (Too much free time - James Taylor - "You've Got a Friend") So now, we just call his name and he comes."

Also, unconditional obedience . . .


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Dennis10458
Posted: Jan 18 2008, 04:47 PM
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Well, I just got through viewing Voyager "Emanations" on Spike.

Wow

No doubt about it, number 3 reincarnation is prevalent in this episode. Also, 9 ritual sacrifice . . .

Frankly, this episode is almost TOO strong to address. Suffice it to say, it leads up to some moments and then backs away. What would have happened if Ptera had made it back to the planet? Did she know of the neural energy transfers to the rings?

That apect of the ep left the answer to everyone's question(s) about the afterlife unanswered, even using 23rd century technology . . .
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